How 'beergate', EU trade war and the Queen's Speech got Telegraph readers fired up this week

The threat of an EU trade war, Sir Keir Starmer potentially resigning over ‘beergate’, and the 38 Bills set out in the Queen’s Speech were three topics that got readers talking this week. 

Here we share the best debates between our readers in the comments section and Letters. You can also join the conversation below.

EU Trade war

EU leaders threatened a trade war after Liz Truss, the Foreign Secretary, proposed to unilaterally change parts of the Northern Ireland Protocol, and it led readers to debate the impact this could have on the UK.

@Vesta Meelz:

“The Protocol was designed to be amended as and when required. Without the support of both communities in Northern Ireland, it is unsustainable. If it can’t be amended to everyone’s satisfaction, it has to go.”

@William Basham:

“Truss can huff and puff, but the EU will not make concessions on the deal agreed by Johnson to ‘get Brexit done’. In the meantime, Britain’s reputation as a country that honours international agreements will be totally trashed. The UK should avoid triggering a trade war with our biggest trade partner, which we cannot win.”

Sir Keir Starmer and ‘beergate’

Readers were divided over whether Sir Keir Starmer should resign as Labour leader if he is fined by Durham Police over ‘beergate’. Charles Moore wrote that it would be ridiculous for him to go, as “no one was harmed in the eating of Sir Keir’s curry”.

@Stuart Goldman:

“Eating a curry and quaffing a beer might have broken some rules, but it’s hardly a hanging offence. What a silly fool Starmer will look if he has to resign whilst Boris remains in office and defeats some second rate Labour leader, not a patch on Starmer himself, at the next election.”

@Colin Drury, Dinas Powys, Glamorgan:

SIR – I must disagree with Charles Moore. Leaving aside the ocean-going hypocrisy Sir Keir has displayed in his condemnation of Boris Johnson, what is totally unacceptable is the series of obfuscations he employed to protect himself and his deputy, all encased in a halo of self-righteousness. The public’s confidence in his honesty and integrity has been shattered so badly that it cannot be restored.”

The Queen’s Speech

Elsewhere, readers were underwhelmed by government policies set out in the 38 Bills, and were critical of the prospect of increased state interference. Following the Queen’s Speech, Philip Johnston argued that “politics has become a dismal race to pass as many pointless laws as possible”.

@Mary Bracewell:

“There is no substance here, just drafts or weak proposals. Where are the proposals that will make a difference to people’s lives, or address the present inequality, fuel and cost of living crises?”

@The West is going west:

“All seems pretty much meagre returns for a Conservative government that started off with such high hopes. One or two good ideas in there, but most of it indicates more state interference in our lives and more wokery, not less.”

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Now it’s your turn: What stories from the week got you talking? Let us know in the comments section below.